Q&A with Paper Tigers

Can you tell us about your family background? Did you always want to be an artist?

I come from a family full of artists, so I never really thought I would take that road. My grandfather was an amazing architect, my grandmother was a concert pianist, my uncle is a photographer, my aunt is a tai-chi teacher, and so many of my cousins are artists across all genres. I always enjoyed making art as a kid, especially crafty things (our mom would let us paint the windows and we were allowed to draw on the walls in my brother’s room), but I didn’t think it was the career for me. It seemed a little too solitary and I didn’t have a sense of how art could be used to make a difference in the world.

Since I was young, I have always had a very strong interest in social justice, and I didn’t see how I could connect that with an art career. I didn’t actually ever learn how to draw until I got to college. I went into college thinking I would be a social worker and then I signed up for a drawing class when I was 19. I was the worst one in the class, but once I started I didn’t want to stop. I loved the feeling of drawing so much that I didn’t care that my drawings weren’t good.

– papertigers.org

Read the full interview 

Eileen Fisher Feature

 

“Katie Yamasaki speaks on Voices Her’d from the Groundswell Community Mural Project. Her message of ‘girls have the floor and they’re going to take it’ stresses the importance of how people see teenage girls and art. She also stresses the importance of sustainable and humane clothing.”

– EileenFisherInc on youtube.com

Motor City Muralism

“Join Detroit Bikes for an extended version of our Motor City Muralism bike tour.  Beginning and ending at the Detroit Institute of Arts, participants will explore murals throughout the city of Detroit and be invited to participate in a discussion of the Diego Rivera murals at the DIA.”

– detroitsyngery.org

Detroit mural from street

Read the full post on detroitsynergy.org

 

Visual Art and Social Transformation, Talk at Asian/Asian American Research Institute

 

“The public art projects of Katie Yamasaki have covered topics from the Japanese Internment to the militarization of inner city youth. In just 8 years since the completion of her MFA at the School of Visual Arts, her work has earned her invitations to develop public art projects in Chiapas, Mexico with the Zapatista Army for National Liberation, Santiago de Cuba, rural Appalachia, Sevilla and Barcelona, Spain, Namibia, Japan, Detroit, New Jersey, Indiana and all over New York City.

For Yamasaki, public and mural art has the unique ability to create new dialogues that challenge the evolving identities of communities in transition, communities of political and/or cultural resistance and communities of the displaced/disenfranchised. Her work, culturally and politically is woven together by the common threads of communication, transformation and liberation.

Yamasaki will share her global public art projects as well as her past and upcoming book projects, two in particular. Fish for Jimmy is a book for children which will be published in September, 2012. Based on a family story, it tells the story of two boys in the Japanese Internment Camps. It is Yamasaki’s first published book as both author/illustrator. She will also discuss Yama, the illustrated biography of her grandfather, architect Minoru Yamasaki. This story tells the tale of the Nisei experience from the perspective of her grandfather who came to be known as one of the most influential American architects of the 20th Century.

Finally, the presentation will consider the evolving role of public art and art of cultural identity in the ever-changing Asian American community.”

– aaaricuny on youtube.com

If Walls Could Talk

About the Project

I am an artist based in Brooklyn. In my work, I’ve been really lucky to witness the transformative effect that art can have on an individual and on a community, especially when that individual and community have the chance to utilize art as a platform for expression- for expression of something essential, something they wish to communicate about themselves, about their experience.

I’ve planned a project here in New York City. I’ll be working with two populations; incarcerated mothers at Rikers Island and the children of incarcerated mothers in East Harlem. I’ll workshop with each group separately, the workshops resulting in imagery and messages that each group wants to communicate with the other. Most simply, it’ll be an image that answers this question of What is something you, as mothers, would like to tell your children- about yourselves, your relationship, your past, your hopes for the future. Maybe something that you find difficult to say to them in person when they come for a visit. We‘ll put this message into an image and send it to the children on the outside who will paint it as a large-scale outdoor mural in their community of East Harlem. For the children, similarly they’ll be creating an image that addresses the question What are some things that you want to say or show your mother that you don’t get to because she’s in jail? What are feelings you want her to know that you have? What are some things she needs to know about you that she may be missing out on because she isn’t here? The children will develop a mural image that the mothers will then paint inside of Rikers.

My hope is that by sending these images back and forth, an unusual dialogue will happen. A dialogue not only between mothers and children, but also with the greater communities that exist both inside of the jail where one mural will be painted and in the neighborhood where the other mural will be painted.

The idea is that this experience will not only be empowering, it will also help these mothers heal from some of the guilt and pain they feel from being separated from their children- encouraging them to do everything in their power to manifest changes that will positively impact their families. I also hope that while the youth work in the community, we will be able to address the stigma that children often carry when they have an incarcerated parent.

In 2009, I did a project at a women’s prison in Chiapas, Mexico. I worked with about 40 women and their children, under 4 years old, who lived with them. There were so many things that struck me during that week, about the lives of these women. But what affected me most about that project were the conversations I had with them about their children on the outside- the children who were too old to join them in the prison and were in the Mexican foster care system, staying with family, or, as one woman described her 11 year old son, just living by himself. The complexity of feelings the women described about their relationships with their estranged children moved something inside of me.

And when I finished the project, I just left. That’s what happens. You leave, they hug you and then they just stay. And you have no idea what will become of them, their children inside of the prison, the 11 year old son living on his own. You leave and they stay. So, I still don’t know what will become of them, but at least we can do this.

There is something that happens when you paint a wall- when you create the imagery that surrounds you and the images are of you, your people, your community, your family, your mother or your child. There is something that happens to both the people who paint it and the people who see it happen- something I’m not sure I could measure. But what I do know, from doing this for awhile, is that this identification, this creation, this visual dialogue can change the way people feel. About themselves, about their families, about their community- about their place in the world. And what I believe is that people are motivated by feelings. People are motivated by love, and that is really the founding principle of this project.

I hope you can support it. I hope you can help make this happen. Most simply, It can only happen with your support. Please donate and please distribute this message to everyone you know.

Learn more at kickstarter.com

Lincoln Arts Project

“Artists Caleb Neelon and Katie Yamasaki are coming together to do a mural on the side of our building (along Whitney Ave) this Labor Day Weekend. The streets and sidewalk will be closed all weekend, feel free to come out and watch them work, and Monday Night from 6-8 we’ll be having a BBQ Reception for the wall as well as a ‘closing’ for the TASTE showArtists Caleb Neelon and Katie Yamasaki are coming together to do a mural on the side of our building (along Whitney Ave) this Labor Day Weekend. The streets and sidewalk will be closed all weekend, feel free to come out and watch them work, and Monday Night from 6-8 we’ll be having a BBQ Reception for the wall as well as a ‘closing’ for the TASTE show.”

– lincolnartsproject

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Kirkus Review of Honda: The Boy Who Dreamed of Car

“Soichiro Honda was, in his own way, the Henry Ford of Japan. He became fascinated by automobiles from his very first sight of a Model T. Determined to learn everything possible about cars, he began as a cleaner in a garage and eventually became an expert mechanic with his own business. Later he designed racecars and manufactured car parts and airplane propellers. After World War II, he developed small motorcycles and started the Honda Motor Company, constantly adding improvements and innovations to his products and then designing and manufacturing fuel-efficient automobiles. Weston presents Honda as a perfectionist, an innovator in his field and a model corporate leader, who encouraged his workers, listened to them and treated them well. However, with the exception of a list of retirement activities, Honda’s life beyond business is nowhere to be found. Yamasaki’s detailed and whimsical acrylics add zest to the proceedings. A worthwhile introduction to a neglected subject.”

– http://www.kirkusreviews.com

Read the full review on kirkusreviews.com

 

Informed, Empowered

 

“Many of the young artists wanted to address the issue of military recruiting, and targeting youth in low-income areas. As a result of the No Child Left Behind Act, military recruiters have access to high-school students contact information, so not only are they being approached in their schools, but also within their own homes. Utilizing a visual style inspired by war-time propaganda posters from around the world, the mural portrays three strong young women in classic military poses, armed not with violent weapons but with tools of creation and education. Banners that read, We Are Not Government Issued, and Arm Yourself with the Knowledge to Think for Yourself stream along the wall.”

– Groundswellmural on youtube.com

Pintando Postales

 

“NYC-based muralist and educator Katie Yamasaki uses postcards to create a dialogue between kids in Cuba and New York. This short-documentary is a candid conversation with the artist, as she explains her motivation behind her project and shows us the hidden power of youth voices.”

– Joél Mejia on youtube.com

Art Project Helps City Kids Connect With Cuban Pen Pals

Xzavier and Roberto Carlos

Xzavier and Roberto Carlos

Xzavier Scott, seen above, was depicted in a portrait which depicts his love of Coney Island and football. He is one of the subjects in “Pintando Postales, Painting Postcards,” an art exhibition that opened Thursday night at Brooklyn College.

Teacher Katie Yamasaki portrayed her art students to help arrange for them pen pals from Cuba…

– Jeanine Ramirez

Read the full article at ny1.com