‘Fish for Jimmy’ Reviewed by NY Times

“Yamasaki, who works as a muralist and educator, creates sweeping paintings that capture the story in a literal manner even as she makes bold metaphorical leaps. When the two boys lie in bed at night, the menacing shadows of the camp’s guard tower are imprinted on their blankets. The family stands poised on Taro’s reclining form, while the imagined torsos of F.B.I. agents loom in a forbidding muddy background. One of the most moving spreads shows Taro capturing fish in a river, each fish carrying a reclining Jimmy on its back.

The overall result is a dramatic, visual feast. And Yamasaki gives readers a reassuringly happy ending.”

– Pamela Paul, NY Times

Read the full review at nytimes.com

Kirkus Review of Honda: The Boy Who Dreamed of Car

“Soichiro Honda was, in his own way, the Henry Ford of Japan. He became fascinated by automobiles from his very first sight of a Model T. Determined to learn everything possible about cars, he began as a cleaner in a garage and eventually became an expert mechanic with his own business. Later he designed racecars and manufactured car parts and airplane propellers. After World War II, he developed small motorcycles and started the Honda Motor Company, constantly adding improvements and innovations to his products and then designing and manufacturing fuel-efficient automobiles. Weston presents Honda as a perfectionist, an innovator in his field and a model corporate leader, who encouraged his workers, listened to them and treated them well. However, with the exception of a list of retirement activities, Honda’s life beyond business is nowhere to be found. Yamasaki’s detailed and whimsical acrylics add zest to the proceedings. A worthwhile introduction to a neglected subject.”

– http://www.kirkusreviews.com

Read the full review on kirkusreviews.com